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20120925
20121003
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government was elected three months ago, a government forcing through yet another round of punishing spending cuts. in a country where one in four are already unemployed, perhaps one shouldn't be surprised the public anger at times tips over into violence. the morning had seen tens of thousands march on parliament demanding the government change course. they know it's hopeless, of course, their leaders are deep in negotiations with europe and the i.m.f. about cutting wages and pensions by anything up to 30%. and this in a city where already one in three businesses has closed. >> we have to do something for our future to have a regular job, to have a family. >> all of europe should have a voice against these policies. >> reporter: there will be little reassurance of promises of no more cuts after these. >> there is no scope for any further reductions in wages and pensions beyond this specific package. this is a commitment that the government has made. >> reporter: the greeks have been told that before. >> yes, they have been told that before. but should the government not meet that commitment,
of what a definition of prevention, a goal to which both governments agree what a definition would be in practice. >> woodruff: i was reading today there was disagreement inside netanyahu's own government that the israeli foreign ministry concludes that the economic sanctions are hitting iran hard calling for another round of economic sanctions. is that significant? >> the economic sanctions are hitting iran the iranian economy is in trouble and the reason why we haven't seen results with regard to the iranian negotiating position is that the p 5 plus 1 has not put on the table anything in the way-- the united states and the other five powers that have been negotiating have not put on the table significant sanctions related-- basically no sanctions relate other than the airplane parts. >> here i disagree with paul very much. the economic sanctions have been a wonderful success and an abysmal failure. they've been a success at raising the economic cost to the iranians but if their real goal is to compel the iranians to change the nuclear policy they've had no visible impact. so that
of government under the constitution. did congress exceed its law-making powers under the constitution when it enacted the health care law? what role do state governments have in enforcing immigration laws? this term a lot of the questions either on the docket or pending, whether the court will take them, really involve equality issues. issues arising under the equal protection act. >> brown: affirmative action is on the docket. >> it is. it's going to be argued next week. it involves the university of texas and whether it can use race as a factor in its admissions policy in order to increase diversity within its student body. >> brown: we're definitely going to look at that next week. but pending, as you say, as you used the word, same sex marriage. >> yes. there are seven petitions that have been filed in the court but they really break down into two cases. first, challenges involving the federal defense of marriage act, a key provision defines marriage for all federal purposes as between a man and a woman. and then the second set involves california's proposition 8. that proposition bann
afghan civilians and police were killed. in iraq, the government announced 365 people were killed during september, the most in more than two years. the total included 26 iraqis who died sunday. a wave of bombings targeted shi- ite neighborhoods, from the northern city of kirkuk to the southern town of kut. the iraqi affiliate of al-qaeda claimed responsibility. iran has restored access to google's e-mail service, a week after the government blocked it. the initial action against g-mail was taken after an anti- islamic video appeared on google's video hosting site, youtube. but the loss of service drew complaints from users, including members of the iranian parliament. the people of greece got more grim news today: they're facing a sixth year of recession. a draft budget projected the greek economy will shrink again in 2013 by almost 4%. unemployment is set to rise another full point, to nearly 25%. meanwhile, euro-zone officials reported unemployment across the continent remained at a record high of 11.4% in august. . >> the figure is much higher than a year ago. it demonstrates the imp
's the first responsibility of governments to control the mobs, to essential... they have the obligation to keep diplomatic missions safe. and there's always going to be things that people aren't going to like. but at the end of the day, people in these societies have delegitimize violence and essentially say no matter how much you disagree with what someone says or writes, it does not give you the right to go out and cause violence. if they do, you the governments have to stop it. that's your obligation under various international charters, under the united nations. i think that's an important message for the world to hear, an important message for the egyptian government to hear. >> ifill: nick burns let's talk about two sticky points when it comes to foreign policy: iran and syria. in both cases in the speech he said we need to speak out against it whether it's assad leaving or syria stopping the slaughter of its own people but he didn't outline exactly what the u.s. would do next about that. that's what some of his critics have said he has come up short on. >> well, it's a real probl
the financial crisis is another. and the growing government debt. that said, i mean i wouldn't underestimate the upside with the u.s. being such a creative economy. for example, energy prices have fallen a lot. and there are some other things you can count to on the upside. but so far businesses have been very reluctant to invest heavily, very reluctant to hire heavily. >> muhamed el-erian what do you see-- when you look at all this data coming in, what is most important to you? >> a few things. first the employment picture. and not just whether we're creating jobs or not. that's important. but also what's happening to those who remain unemployed. and that is a pretty worsening picture. that's why i call 2 a crisis. because long-term unemployment is really high. and youth unemployment is really high. and these are longer-term issues that we need to deal with. so the employment picture is very important. second, clarity for businesses. today no one has the confidence to invest. there is a ton of money, judy, on the sideline, a ton of money. and if we can engage that money in the system would
of homs, as government troops target rebel bastions. >> one-and-a-half years after it began and the battle for this city and for syria grinds on relentlessly. the bombardment of hommes. the war here is as intense as ever. >> ifill: as world leaders gather in new york for the annual meeting of the united nations general assembly. margaret warner gives us a preview. >> woodruff: will new genetic findings reshape the treatment of breast cancer? we ask dr. harold varmus, head of the national cancer institute. >> ifill: and ray suarez kicks off american graduate week with a conversation with three now- successful people who know exactly what it's like to want to drop out of high school. >> sometimes we give up on kids too soon. sometimes we want to teach to the test instead of teaching to transform. sometimes that comes from top-down policies. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: soon computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailore
center for al-shabab, the group that's fought somalia's internationally backed government for years. al-shabab is allied with al- qaeda, but the militants now have been driven out of all of somalia's major cities. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the men at the top of the presidential tickets hunkered down again today for debate preparation, ahead of the big meeting tomorrow night. but they also managed to break away briefly-- president obama for a visit to the hoover dam, and governor romney out with an aide to buy lunch, a burrito. meanwhile, their running mates made multiple stops in key states. vice president biden told a crowd in charlotte, north carolina that mitt romney would raise taxes on most americans to fund tax cuts for the wealthy. >> how they can justify raising taxes on the middle class has been buried the last four years. how in lord's name can they justify raising their taxes with these tax cuts? look, folks, we've seen this movie before. massive tax cuts for the wealthy. eliminating restrictions on wall street. let the banks w
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)

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